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CATHOLIC PROGRAMMING HIGHLIGHTS

 

Catholic Television

EWTN News Nightly

EWTN News Nightly

Monday - Friday 6 PM ET

EWTN's daily news and analysis program from Washington, DC.

 

 

   
Catholic Television

EWTN Theology Roundtable

05/20 10:00 PM ET; 05/24 5:00 AM ET; 05/25 2:00 PM ET

Colin Donovan, Father Mark Mary, MFVA, and Cindy Cuellar discuss the growing moral crisis related to End of Life medical care.

 

 

 

Catholic Radio

Open Line

Tuesdays at 3pm ET

Fr. Wade Menezes joins EWTN radio’s topic driven call-in show on Tuesdays. Fr. Wade will takes your questions on faith, family and fellowship. Make sure you call with your questions.

 

 

 

Called To Communion

Sunday - Friday 2pm ET

What’s stopping you from becoming Catholic? Catholic catechist, writer and speaker, Dr. David Anders talks lovingly but clearly with non-Catholics & fallen-away Catholics in this live call-in show.

 

http://www.cialij.com/?can.taking.cialis.cause.ed

 

 

FEATURED
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May 9, 2018
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The Bourbon virus is part of a group called thogotoviruses, and it's relatively new on the radar. There have only been a few cases so far, mostly in the South and Midwest, and some of these patients died. The virus is thought to spread through the bite of an infected tick, but the exact way it infects people is still unknown, according to the CDC. People who become infected with the Bourbon virus may develop flu-like symptoms as well as nausea and vomiting. They may also have low white blood cell and platelet counts. .
The Powassan (POW) virus is a rare virus spread to humans from the deer tick. There are only an average of 9 cases each year  but in 2016, there were 21 cases, double that in previous years. POW virus primarily occurs in the Northeast or Great Lakes region, particularly in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Many people who contract POW virus do not have any symptoms, but those who do may experience a fever, headache, vomiting, and also mental confusion, memory loss, or seizures. It can take up to a month for symptoms to appear after being bitten by an infected tick. If left untreated, the POW virus can spread to the central nervous system and lead to encephalitis or meningitis. Unfortunately, there is no medication or vaccine to treat or prevent POW virus. About half of those who survive the POW virus will have permanent neurological problems, and 10% of the encephalitis cases caused by POW are fatal, according to the CDC. http://game-megaupload.com/Renzullo-son-of-Martincic-from-Loubersan?Anzuresfa=228
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Photo Researchers / Getty Images / Via gettyimages.com .
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