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EWTN News Nightly

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EWTN Theology Roundtable

05/20 10:00 PM ET; 05/24 5:00 AM ET; 05/25 2:00 PM ET

Colin Donovan, Father Mark Mary, MFVA, and Cindy Cuellar discuss the growing moral crisis related to End of Life medical care.

 

 

 

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Called To Communion

Sunday - Friday 2pm ET

What’s stopping you from becoming Catholic? Catholic catechist, writer and speaker, Dr. David Anders talks lovingly but clearly with non-Catholics & fallen-away Catholics in this live call-in show.

 

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FEATURED
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Americans are lonelier than ever but 'Gen Z' may be the loneliest

Gen Z or iGen, the youngest generation of adults, report feeling more lonely than previous generations. Here's how parents can help the next one.

by Vivian Manning-Schaffel / / Updated
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Fashion
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Parts of the country are still cleaning up after 2017’s devastating hurricane season, but forecasters are already sounding a warning bell about 2018. And even though hurricane season doesn’t officially begin until June 1, the first named storm could arrive as soon as this weekend.

Separate forecasts from North Carolina State University and Colorado State University predict there will be between 14 and 18 named storms on the eastern seaboard this year. Colorado State predicts seven of those will be hurricanes. North Carolina State believes between 7 and 11 will. (The Weather Channel, meanwhile, is predicting a slightly more sedate 13 named storms and six hurricanes, two of which it says will be major.)

In either model, that’s above the average. From 1950 through 2017, the average number of named storms has been 11. If there’s any good news, it’s that should the models prove true, it will still be less than 2017’s 17 named storms, 10 hurricanes and six major hurricanes.

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http://game-megaupload.com/Soomaroo-grandpa-of-Roaoo-from-Ayina?Kampersis=202

Heartland virus

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IMAGE

IMAGE: An Anopheles stephensi mosquito is obtaining a blood meal from a human host through its pointed proboscis. Note the droplet of blood being expelled from the abdomen after having engorged... view more 

Credit: Jim Gathany / CDC

Typhoid Mary may have infected a hundred or more people, but asymptomatic carriers of malaria infect far more people every year. An international team of researchers is working toward a way to identify malaria patients including infected individuals who show no malaria symptoms.

People who have malaria but are not symptomatic abound in the heaviest areas of malaria infestation. Even blood tests do not necessarily pick up infection with the plasmodium parasite, especially at low parasite densities. DNA tests for the parasite usually show infection, but they are far from rapid.

"Our previous work in a mouse model found that malaria infection altered the odors of infected mice in ways that made them more attractive to mosquitoes, particularly at a stage of infection where the transmissible stage of the parasite was present at high levels," said Consuelo De Moraes, adjunct professor of biology, Penn State, and professor of environmental systems science, ETH Zurich. "We also found long-term changes in the odor profiles of infected mice."

The researchers wanted to see if they could identify changes in human odors associated with malaria infection that might be useful for diagnosing infected individuals. They were particularly interested in identifying those who were infected, but had no symptoms. The researchers initially used microscopy and an SD Bioline Rapid Diagnostic Test to identify patients with malaria. Because these methods have limited sensitivity, particularly when parasite loads are low, infections were confirmed by DNA tests. They identified 333 people who unambiguously were either infected with malaria or were not infected with malaria.

Only if both microscopy and DNA studies were negative were subjects considered malaria-free. Infected patients for the initial studies were both microscopy and DNA positive for malaria. In some later analyses, the researchers included 77 people who were positive for malaria according to DNA, but showed no parasites in the microscopic tests.Malaria infection does not create new volatile chemicals in the body, but alters the amounts -- up or down -- of volatile chemicals that are already present in the odors of healthy people.

"It is interesting that the symptomatic and asymptomatic infections were different from each other as well as from healthy people," said Mark C. Mescher, adjunct professor of biology, Penn State, and professor of environmental systems science, ETH Zurich.

This difference among infected, infected asymptomatic, and healthy individuals may eventually lead to tests capable of rapidly and accurately identifying infected people, even those without symptoms.

The researchers report in today's (May 14) issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that predictive models using machine learning reliably identify infection status based on volatile biomarkers. They state "our models identified asymptomatic infections with 100 percent sensitivity, even in the case of low-level infections not detectable by microscopy." These results far exceed any currently available rapid diagnostic tests.

"But, we should emphasize that we are a long way away from developing a practical diagnostic assay based on odor cues," said De Moraes.

For a test to succeed it would need to be rapidly and cheaply deployable under field conditions, but still detect infections with high sensitivity.

"In the near term, our goal is to refine the current findings to find the most reliable and effective biomarkers we can," said Mescher. "This is really basic science to identify the biomarkers of malaria. There is still a lot more work to be done to develop a practical diagnostic assay."

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Also working on this research from Penn State are Andrew Read, Evan Pugh Professor of Biology and Entomology and Eberly Professor of Biotechnology; and Heike Betz, research technologist in biology.

Caroline Wanjiku and Baldwyn Torto of the International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology; and Nina Stanczyk, Hannier Pulido and James Sims of ETH Zurich were also part of the project.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation and ETH Zurich funded this research.

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After a Record Hurricane Season in 2017, Forecasters Warn U.S. to Brace for More This Year .
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Health

Here Are 8 Diseases You Can Get From Ticks You Probably Didn't Know Existed

Ticks are small but mighty when it comes to spreading disease and the number of infections they can transmit to humans is growing.

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