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CATHOLIC PROGRAMMING HIGHLIGHTS

 

Catholic Television

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EWTN News Nightly

Monday - Friday 6 PM ET

EWTN's daily news and analysis program from Washington, DC.

 

 

   
Catholic Television

EWTN Theology Roundtable

05/20 10:00 PM ET; 05/24 5:00 AM ET; 05/25 2:00 PM ET

Colin Donovan, Father Mark Mary, MFVA, and Cindy Cuellar discuss the growing moral crisis related to End of Life medical care.

 

 

 

Catholic Radio

Open Line

Tuesdays at 3pm ET

Fr. Wade Menezes joins EWTN radio’s topic driven call-in show on Tuesdays. Fr. Wade will takes your questions on faith, family and fellowship. Make sure you call with your questions.

 

 

 

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Sunday - Friday 2pm ET

What’s stopping you from becoming Catholic? Catholic catechist, writer and speaker, Dr. David Anders talks lovingly but clearly with non-Catholics & fallen-away Catholics in this live call-in show.

 

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Tularemia is an infection caused by the highly contagious Francisella tularensis bacterium, which can be spread to humans from the dog tick, wood tick, or lone star tick. Tularemia is also known as rabbit fever because it can infect and kill rabbits, hares, and rats. There are around 200 cases in people reported each year, primarily in the states of Kansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, and Arkansas. It can also spread to humans from contact with infected animals or exposure to aerosolized bacteria, which can happen if someone accidentally runs a mower over an animal that died of the disease. The symptoms of tularemia depend on how the bacteria entered the body. If the tularemia is contracted from an infected tick bite or from handling an infected animal, patients can develop glandular tularemia, which causes swollen lymph nodes in the armpits or groin. Sometimes, this is accompanied by an ulcer at the location of the tick bite or site where the bacteria entered the body. That's called ulceroglandular tularemia (pictured above). The infection can be treated with multiple antibiotics and most patients will make a full recovery. .
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