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EWTN Theology Roundtable

05/20 10:00 PM ET; 05/24 5:00 AM ET; 05/25 2:00 PM ET

Colin Donovan, Father Mark Mary, MFVA, and Cindy Cuellar discuss the growing moral crisis related to End of Life medical care.

 

 

 

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Fr. Wade Menezes joins EWTN radio’s topic driven call-in show on Tuesdays. Fr. Wade will takes your questions on faith, family and fellowship. Make sure you call with your questions.

 

 

 

Called To Communion

Sunday - Friday 2pm ET

What’s stopping you from becoming Catholic? Catholic catechist, writer and speaker, Dr. David Anders talks lovingly but clearly with non-Catholics & fallen-away Catholics in this live call-in show.

 

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FEATURED

Babesiosis is a rare disease caused by a microscopic parasite, Babesia microti, which infects red blood cells. It is spread to humans through the bite of an infected black-legged (deer) tick, the same tick that spreads Lyme disease. Younger ticks (nymphs) typically spread the parasite, which means they are extremely tiny about the size of a poppy seed and difficult to spot with the naked eye.

Most cases occur in the Northeast (New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Connecticut) or Midwest (Minnesota, Wisconsin) during the spring and summer months. Between 2011 and 2014, there were an average of 1,135 cases reported each year.

Most people who get babesiosis do not develop any symptoms, but some people with weaker immune systems  the elderly, very young, and immunocompromised individuals  may experience mild flu-like symptoms, according to the New York Department of Health. Asymptomatic patients do not require any treatment, but those with symptoms can be treated with a combination of antibiotics.

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Classroom anxiety

A couple of hours before the final bell was set to ring on a recent spring day at Torres school, Lysander Borrero Terry High, the lights went out yet another power failure that afflicts the island intermittently.

Students immediately grew anxious to leave so they could rush to line up at gas stations to get fuel for generators, teachers said. They worried about powering computers at home to complete their homework, and charging their cellphones.

The anxiety is similar when a thunderstorm rolls in, English teacher Iliana Marrero said. Students run to the halls and look to the skies. They ask whether classes will be suspended.

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    Tularemia is an infection caused by the highly contagious Francisella tularensis bacterium, which can be spread to humans from the dog tick, wood tick, or lone star tick. Tularemia is also known as rabbit fever because it can infect and kill rabbits, hares, and rats. There are around 200 cases in people reported each year, primarily in the states of Kansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, and Arkansas. It can also spread to humans from contact with infected animals or exposure to aerosolized bacteria, which can happen if someone accidentally runs a mower over an animal that died of the disease. The symptoms of tularemia depend on how the bacteria entered the body. If the tularemia is contracted from an infected tick bite or from handling an infected animal, patients can develop glandular tularemia, which causes swollen lymph nodes in the armpits or groin. Sometimes, this is accompanied by an ulcer at the location of the tick bite or site where the bacteria entered the body. That's called ulceroglandular tularemia (pictured above). The infection can be treated with multiple antibiotics and most patients will make a full recovery. .
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